Targetjobs – latest deadlines

deadlines-approaching-web_0

If you’re hunting for a graduate job or training scheme for after your finals, there are still vacancies available with big-name employers to start this summer and autumn. Keep an eye out for our weekly round-up of application closing dates so you can make sure you don’t miss your chance to apply. Graduate employers with deadlines on the way include Amazon.co.uk, Allianz and thetraineline.com.

21 May is the deadline for the following graduate roles and schemes:

22 May is the deadline for the FactSet graduate consultant role, for a summer 2017 start.

25 May is the closing date for the technology graduate programme with Amazon.co.uk, in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) business.

26 May is your last chance to apply for the Allianz graduate pricing analyst role.

More advice to help you with your graduate job hunt

 Courtery ‘Targetjobs’ May 2017

How to use LinkedIn to find employers – mini series

bath-linkedin

We are going to shamelessly link to the University of Leeds Careers Centre Blog as they have done an excellent job, through three blog posts, in writing about how you can use LinkedIn to find relevant employers. Thank you Team Leeds!

“Whether you’re looking for experience, placements or a graduate job, it can sometimes be hard to identify potential relevant employers.  This is particularly so if you’re looking outside of the large multi-national organisations. Opportunities with other types of employers, or in other sectors, may not be as widely advertised, and many people actually find jobs and experience by pro-actively approaching employers of interest on a speculative basis. In this 3-part mini series, we’ll show you 3 easy ways you can leverage LinkedIn to identify potential employers of interest.”

3 ways LinkedIn can help you find relevant employers: Part 1 – outlines how the advanced people search function can help you identify potential employers.

3 ways LinkedIn can help you find relevant employers: Part 2 – outlines how you can use the company search feature to identify employers by location and sector.

3 ways LinkedIn can help you find potential employers: Part 3 – shows how you can use two features of LinkedIn to help you find similar organisations to those you have already discovered.

 

Acknowledgement: Bath University Careers and Leeds University Careers

9 Tips For Using Social Media In Your Job Hunt

linkedIN blog

Most of us use social media on a daily basis, but did you know that used strategically, social media can also be a great job search tool? Here are some tips to get you started.

Develop a professional presence

What do people find when they Google your name? This is something you need to look at, as most employers these days will Google potential job candidates to see what comes up. If the results bring up unprofessional pics or posts, then it’s time to clean up your online image. Start by taking down anything you wouldn’t want an employer to see, and set up a professional profile on LinkedIn, and make sure you include a professional-looking photo. Do the same for Twitter, Google and Facebook, and any other social media you use.

Know what information to include

Look at how other professionals in your industry present themselves online, what social media networks they belong to and what information they include in their profiles. This will give you insight into industry ‘best practice’ and will help you to develop your own profile. Make sure all your social media profiles include keywords that a recruiter or hiring manager might use to find a person just like you.

Be careful what you say

You need to present the best image of yourself online. Whether you’re blogging, tweeting or updating your Facebook status, it’s important that you maintain your reputation and professional credibility. The last thing you want to do is destroy all your hard work by making a careless Twitter comment. What you do on social media is there to stay, so think before you tweet, blog, post or share.

Activate your privacy settings

You need to effectively manage the information that’s available about you online. That means you should make sure your personal information on Facebook is private. Use the Privacy Settings and Tools menu to manage what’s visible to others and ensure that it’s set to Friends and not Everyone! This way, if an employer Googles you, they won’t be able to see the details of your profile and delve into your personal life.

Establish your own URL

Add the URL for your LinkedIn profile and Twitter handle to your CV (but not your Facebook profile). This provides an employer with another avenue to connect with you and allows them to see you in a professional light. It also demonstrates that you are social media savvy, which is an increasingly desirable asset.

Engage in online conversations

Participating in online conversations and discussion forums helps you to establish yourself as an expert in the field. It also demonstrates that you are serious about contributing to your industry, so you should share content, forward links and answer questions whenever it’s appropriate.

Connect with the right people

LinkedIn can be a great resource for finding information on organisations and the individuals who work there. If you’re looking for opportunities that aren’t advertised, put together a list of companies that you’re interested in. Use LinkedIn and your investigative powers to find out the names of people who work there and then look at ways that you can start connecting with them.Follow them on Twitter, repost their tweets, and look at who your shared connections are.

Let people know you are looking

Make sure your connections know that you’re looking for a job, as your contacts are the best people to provide you with referrals. You want people to think of you when a position becomes available and for them to let you know when they hear about a position they think you would be interested in.

Follow industry news

There is not one social media network that works best for all job seekers. The important thing is to know which platforms are most used by your industry. Find out the latest happenings by joining specialist industry groups on LinkedIn, following industry blogs, signing up to newsletters and participating in discussion forums. This helps you stay up-to-date with the latest industry information and provides you with the opportunity to make connections that could result in job leads.

More on LinkedIn – how to get ‘Groups’ to work for you

 

Why join LinkedIn Groups…….

 

Simply, within the vast network of separated professionals on LinkedIn, groups allow people to connect on a single theme. Groups are a great way to network with NEW people without introductions or cold calling. Why? Because you have something in common.

Groups can be anything from alumni associations, professional associations, common interests, even companies and subsets within companies, you can even create your own group in about 2 minutes.

 

Why groups are a great job search tool

 

By joining and participating in a group, you (the job seeker) have a powerful way of adding value to and growing your online reputation. When you participate, people notice.

 

Furthermore, by being members of the same group as your target company, your odds of getting a favourable response to your job inquiry are much higher.

 

Group Guidelines for the Job Seeker

 

Join a group that takes you where you want to go, not one that keeps you where you are.

Join a group that you WILL participate in. Don’t be a fly on the wall.

Participation in a group means posting and responding to discussion. Make sure you are putting your best foot forward, be positive, show your motivation.

Tell your truth but don’t shout! If you are unemployed, then don’t be ashamed and try to keep it a secret, but don’t flaunt it either. Just be cool and make sure that you are always honest about where you are and what you are looking for.

Identify other leaders in the group and determine whether they could be valuable connections or information sources; if so, then by all means reach out to them.

A recruiter’s view point helps with application forms…….

If you try to see the graduate recruitment process – and your own part in it – from the employer’s point of view, it will help to clarify what you need to show in your application. Understanding what the recruiter is looking for will help you to get the graduate scheme place, internship or job you want.

The recruiter wants to take on the best and brightest graduates, both to meet current staffing needs and to develop the company’s future leaders. However, even if you’re right for the job in every way, your prospective employer doesn’t know it yet. You have to succeed at each stage of the recruitment process in order to get your chance to show what you’re really capable of.

Recruiters have checklists, so help them tick them off

Whether they’re going through applications, interviewing, or observing at an assessment centre, graduate recruiters will be looking for a specific checklist of qualifications and skills. You know what it is, because it will be set out in the job description, and you will also be able to use the company website and literature to find out more about what they want. Make it easy for them to work down that checklist and put a big tick next to every point. Be clear about how you meet each requirement.

All employers want the best… but they have to sift to find it

The recruiter may have numerous other applications to filter out before coming to the conclusion that you’re the one to go for. How many graduate applications do employers in different sectors expect to receive for each vacancy? Here are the figures, according to the most recent edition of the biannual membership survey carried out by the Association of Graduate Recruiters (AGR).

From a job-hunter’s point of view? These are intimidating odds. From a recruiter’s? Hard work.

  • AGR average applications per vacancy 2011-2012 recruitment cycle: 73.2
  • Retail: 153.8, up from 71.2 in 2012-11
  • Investment banks or fund managers: 141.8, down from 232.5 in 2010-11
  • Fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) 134.1
  • Insurance company 98.9
  • Energy, water or utility company 94.8
  • Transport or logistics 84.6
  • Banking or financial services 78.6
  • IT/telecommunications company 76.3
  • Accountancy or professional services firm 55.1
  • Engineering or industrial company 50.8
  • Construction company or consultancy 50.3
  • Consulting or business services firm 44.5
  • Law firm 44.5
  • Public sector 43.7

Bear in mind these stats are likely to be on the high side, because AGR members tend to be large graduate employers that attract a high volume of applications. Also, these are average figures, and mask variations between employers, so can be misleading.

Don’t overlook the small and medium sized enterprises who are also on the lookout for graduate talent; they may offer great opportunities for early responsibility.

Give your application the best possible chance of getting through

If you were a recruiter, how would you work through all those applications to find the best candidate? Chances are you would:

  • Be disinclined to tolerate spelling mistakes, grammatical errors and any other signs of sloppiness.
  • Weed out applications that don’t follow instructions.
  • Stick to your checklist, looking for applications that are a good clear match for the criteria you’ve set out, and rejecting any that aren’t. Are the candidate’s skills and experience described in a way that shows he or she has the right qualifications and aptitudes? If not – why not? Courtesy of Target Jobs.

Don’t forget you can get help with your applications by checking  out our Careers webpages on this subject and when you have a draft application ready, pop in to see a Careers Advisor for advice.

An interesting approach to Job Hunting……

Came across this review on an organisational tool for job hunting and have just tried it out. I must admit that it is pretty swift and on first impressions think that this is a very good approach regarding the graduate job process and one that can help graduates doing multiple applications.

huntsy owl

As graduates, you probably do a lot of graduate and internship job applications. And so far, the best way forward was to have an excel spreadsheet and keep all the details in that sheet. Or make notes of different jobs and dates in a diary.

Now Huntsy brings an organisational gem which costs nothing. Yes! A pleasant surprise, Huntsy is free to use.

Using Huntsy

One of the things that I appreciate the most in new web applications and services is an easy sign-up. Huntsy offers sign up via social logins such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

huntsy login

Once logged-in, you get a simple and effective user interface. It does what you need it to do – organise your job hunt. You can simply add a job URL or enter the job manually and it will organise it in a table-like format with more information available when you click on it.

This is exceptionally helpful in graduate job applications because of the sheer number of applications graduates do and when keeping track of them becomes chaotic.

Another top feature of Huntsy is uploading documents and email templates. It’s a lot better to keep your cover letter and  CV right at the heart of your graduate job hunt process. Plus, it means you have a CV saved on the cloud, which is useful as it offers a backup to your laptop and usb storage.

Huntsy has the option of adding a bookmarklet or extension for the Google Chrome browser which means you will be able to keep track of new graduate job applications with one click.

job hunting tool

Thoughts on Huntsy

Huntsy is a brilliant organisational tool. They market themselves as a job hunting tool which potentially will  have a big market with students and graduates.

It is simple and easy to use. It does what it says on the tin. It allows you to get notified when deadlines are approaching and keeps your documents at the heart of your graduate job application process.

Ever keen to keep on top of bugs and the like, Huntsy have a contact email address, hello@huntsy.com for suggestions and they do monitor this address and take note of your comments. I haven’t found an Android or Iphone app as yet, but that could be coming to Huntsy in the very near future.

Personally I would recommend that you head over to Huntsy and give it a go yourself.

It is good and I hope it keeps developing to suit the graduate and student market with a bit more functionality, but even as it is, it is very good.

The Pros and Cons of using Social Media for recruiting

Speaker’s presentations from the ‘Recruitment using Social Media‘ event at the University of Aberdeen

Saw this very topic article in LinkedIn about social media recruiting from the University of Aberdeen and thought that I would share it with you. It gives some very useful pointers from the recruiters point of view along with perspectives from students/graduates in the job-hunting pipeline.

Check out the various contributors’ slides below:

Campbell Urquhart – Urquhart Partnership: http://prezi.com/3aikzdhgkix3/aberdeen-university-join-up

Alex Barton – Student Designers: http://www.box.com/s/si1mspn1471s62l9ko9a

Robert Holland + Lisa Jackson – Balfour + Manson:http://www.box.com/s/yyzo1rqbapgxurpy0vu8

Rachel Jeffers – University of Aberdeen: http://prezi.com/j907qj_elfbl/recruitment-using-social-media/?auth_key=66278a19b45217bddc4ac397b9056b655036cabc